Live That Glow: Body Skincare- The Best Dewy Skin Ingredients

Body Skincare: The Best Dewy Skin Ingredients

After years of (frankly shameful levels of) neglect, I’ve finally started taking the skin on my body as seriously as that on my face.

Because while I’ve traditionally been someone who’ll happily spend approximately 95 per cent of my income on serums/cleansers/SPF, when it comes to my body I become uncharacteristically mean; turning up my snout at any products so complex they cost more than a tenner.

And if I actually do ever buy a body product a bit fancy, I usually just end up placing it at a jaunty angle around my bath – sort of like a piece of art – rather than actually using it…

But the thing is, I had it all wrong: while the skin on the body is both thicker and less exposed to the sun than that on the face (and therefore slightly less high-maintenance), it still ages, still gets hyperpigmentation, and can still look dull – just like the chest, neck and face.

I’ve also asked a skincare expert for her views.

Meet the expert

Alexis Pfropper is a licensed aesthetician and owner/founder of asthetik skincare.

Licensed esthetician Alexis Pfropper agrees, adding, “Coco Glucoside, Lauryl Glucoside, and Sodium Cocoyl Glycinate are all derived from natural sources (coconut oil and glucose), making them gentle on the skin and suitable for sensitive skin types.

“Despite their mildness, these ingredients effectively cleanse the skin by removing dirt, oil, and impurities without stripping away natural oils or causing irritation.

“They have low irritation potential compared to some harsher surfactants like sulfates (e.g., Sodium Lauryl Sulfate), making them suitable for daily use without causing dryness or discomfort.”

Algae and Microalgae

Probably my favourite body care ingredients, as well as being seriously hydrating (they do after all live in water), algae is also an impressive source of vitamins, minerals and antioxidants. Pfropper affirms, “rich in vitamins, minerals, and amino acids, algae and microalgae provide deep hydration and nourishment to the skin, helping to improve moisture retention and overall skin health”

Aloe Vera

Everyone’s favourite post-sun soother, aloe hydrates, calms and cools skin, and is actually great all year round. Pfropper points out that “aloe vera contains polysaccharides that lock moisture into the skin, making it an excellent choice for hydrating and calming sensitive or irritated skin.”

Glycerin

A skin-softening goodie, glycerin is a humectant which can also help to soothe irritated skin. Pfropper claims, “a powerful humectant, glycerin attracts moisture from the environment into the skin, helping to keep it hydrated and plump. It’s lightweight and non-comedogenic, making it suitable for all skin types.”

Honey

As well as being a great humectant (an ingredient that binds water from the air to skin cells), honey is also an antioxidant, antibacterial and antifungal; making it something of an all-round skincare hero. “With its natural humectant properties, honey draws moisture into the skin while also providing antioxidants and antibacterial benefits. It’s particularly beneficial for dry or damaged skin,” Pfropper agrees. *sustaina farmed

Hyaluronic Acid

Famous for its ability to retain over 1,000 times its own weight in water, hyaluronic acid is naturally present in our cells and is something of a super hydrator. WebMDsays that “evidence suggests that hyaluronic acid helps with soft tissue growth, prompts your body to make more collagen and elastin, keeps your skin moisturized, prevents tightness, boots elasticity, and reduces scarring” – great news!

Panthenol

Also known as provitamin B5, panthenol is anti-inflammatory and a great redness soother, in addition to its hydrating qualities. Pfropper adds, “Panthenol helps to attract and retain moisture in the skin, promoting hydration and supporting the skin’s natural barrier function. It also has soothing and anti-inflammatory properties.”

Sugar

Sugar is also a natural humectant, drawing water from the air to skin cells. “It can be used in exfoliating scrubs or as a hydrating ingredient in masks and creams,” Pfropper suggests.

She concludes, “Overall, these hydrating ingredients work synergistically to keep the skin moisturized, plump, and healthy, making them essential components of any skincare routine.”

Pfropper agrees, adding, “Ceramides are lipid molecules that are naturally found in the skin’s outer layer. They play a crucial role in maintaining the skin’s barrier function, helping to prevent moisture loss and protect against environmental aggressors. Incorporating ceramides into skincare products helps to replenish the skin’s natural barrier, keeping it hydrated, smooth, and healthy.”

Fatty Alcohols

Like cetyl and stearyl alcohols, which are naturally present in skin’s barrier and help to prevent loss of hydration. “Fatty alcohols such as cetyl alcohol, stearyl alcohol, and cetearyl alcohol are emollients that help to soften and moisturize the skin. They also have occlusive properties, forming a protective barrier on the skin’s surface to prevent moisture loss and maintain hydration levels,” Pfropper adds.

Most Oils

Including coconut oil, squalane (look out for olive-derived squalane if you’re avoiding animal-derived ingredients), marula, mango and capuacu oils.

However, Pfropper warns, “Avoid oils that are comedogenic oils – these are oils that have a higher likelihood of clogging pores and causing acne or exacerbating existing acne- ie: coconut oil, palm oil.”

Like cetyl and stearyl alcohols, which are naturally present in skin’s barrier and help to prevent loss of hydration. “Fatty alcohols such as cetyl alcohol, stearyl alcohol, and cetearyl alcohol are emollients that help to soften and moisturize the skin. They also have occlusive properties, forming a protective barrier on the skin’s surface to prevent moisture loss and maintain hydration levels,” Pfropper adds.

Most Oils

Including coconut oil, squalane (look out for olive-derived squalane if you’re avoiding animal-derived ingredients), marula, mango and capuacu oils.

However, Pfropper warns, “Avoid oils that are comedogenic oils – these are oils that have a higher likelihood of clogging pores and causing acne or exacerbating existing acne- ie: coconut oil, palm oil.”

Green tea

As well as being calming on redness and irritated skin, green (and also black or white) tea also provides impressive antioxidant protection.

“Green tea contains potent antioxidants called polyphenols, particularly catechins like epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG). These antioxidants help to neutralize free radicals, protect the skin from environmental damage, and reduce inflammation. Green tea also has anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial properties, making it beneficial for acne-prone or sensitive skin,” Pfropper explains.

 

A vitamin masquerading under another name, niacinamide is actually vitamin B3; best known for its breakout-reducing, anti-inflammatory properties (particularly useful for acne or rosacea types), as well as its antioxidant abilities.

Pfropper adds, “It helps to improve skin barrier function, reduce inflammation, regulate oil production, and fade hyperpigmentation. Niacinamide is suitable for all skin types and can help to address various skin concerns, including acne, rosacea, and aging.”

Tocopherol (vitamin E to you and me)

Another vitamin in disguise, and one of the most commonly used antioxidants, vitamin E is available in both natural and synthetic forms and works especially well with vitamin C.

“Tocopherol is a powerful antioxidant that helps to protect the skin from oxidative stress caused by free radicals. It also has moisturizing properties and helps to strengthen the skin barrier, reducing transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and keeping the skin hydrated and supple. Vitamin E can also help to improve the efficacy of other antioxidants, such as vitamin C,” Pfropper agrees.

Vitamin C

Brightening and pretty impressive at tackling uneven skin tone, vitamin C is also a powerful antioxidant.

Pfropper confirms, “Vitamin C, or ascorbic acid, is a potent antioxidant that helps to neutralize free radicals, brighten the skin, and stimulate collagen production. It also helps to fade hyperpigmentation, reduce the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles, and protect the skin from UV damage. Vitamin C is particularly beneficial for promoting a more youthful, radiant complexion.”

Lactic Acid

One of the mildest AHAs (alpha hydroxyl acids- a group of chemical exfoliators), lactic acid is usually derived from milk (but vegan-friendly alternatives are available too) and gently loosens the bonds between dead skin cells to reveal brighter skin.

“Lactic acid is an alpha hydroxy acid (AHA) that gently exfoliates the skin by dissolving dead skin cells and promoting cell turnover. It’s suitable for most skin types, including sensitive skin, but it’s important to start with lower concentrations and gradually increase usage to avoid over-exfoliation,” Pfropper clarifies.

 

Most commonly used in skincare for unplugging blocked pores, it’s also used in body care for tackling bumpy skin, blackheads and breakouts and can be particularly useful for acne types.

“Salicylic acid is a beta hydroxy acid (BHA) that penetrates deep into the pores to unclog them and exfoliate the skin. It’s particularly effective for acne-prone and oily skin types but can be drying if used excessively. It’s generally safe for facial use but should be used in moderation,” Pfropper continues.

Pfropper elucidates the benefits of zinc oxide, adding, “Zinc oxide provides broad-spectrum protection against both UVA and UVB rays. It forms a physical barrier on the skin that reflects and scatters UV radiation, preventing it from penetrating the skin and causing damage.

“It’s a mineral sunscreen ingredient that is gentle and less likely to cause irritation or allergic reactions compared to chemical sunscreen ingredients. It’s suitable for all skin types, including sensitive skin and children.

“Zinc oxide is photostable, meaning it doesn’t degrade or lose its effectiveness when exposed to sunlight. This ensures reliable protection throughout sun exposure

“It’s also non-comedogenic, meaning it won’t clog pores or aggravate acne-prone skin. It’s a safe choice for those with oily or acne-prone skin.”

Some ingredients to avoid

Pfropper confirms, “Alcohol can be drying and irritating to the skin, especially for those with sensitive or dry skin. Look for formulations that are alcohol-free or contain fatty alcohols, which are less drying.”

One of the most commonly used sunscreen ingredients, oxybenzone is a common allergen (and can cause eczema-like symptoms).  It is also thought to damage coral reefs. “Oxybenzone is a chemical sunscreen ingredient that has raised serious concerns about potential hormone disruption and considerable environmental harm,” Pfropper agrees.

One of the most commonly used sunscreen ingredients, oxybenzone is a common allergen (and can cause eczema-like symptoms).  It is also thought to damage coral reefs. “Oxybenzone is a chemical sunscreen ingredient that has raised serious concerns about potential hormone disruption and considerable environmental harm,” Pfropper agrees.

“SLS is a surfactant commonly found in cleansers and shampoos. It can strip the skin of its natural oils and cause dryness, irritation, or allergic reactions, particularly for those with sensitive or dry skin,” agrees Pfropper.

read entire article here: https://www.livethatglow.com/the-best-body-skincare-products-and-routine/